Roux – Definition

Tagged: Creole Cooking | Related topics: , , , , , ,

[ROO] A mixture of flour and fat that, after being slowly cooked over low heat, is used to thicken mixtures such a soups and sauces. There are three classic roux-white, blond and brown. The color and flavor is determined by the length of time the mixture is cooked. Both white roux and blond roux are made with butter. The former is cooked just until it begins to turn beige and the latter until pale golden. Fuller-flavored brown roux can be made with butter, drippings or pork or beef fat. ti’s cooked to a deep golden brown and used for rich, dark soups and sauces. CAJUN and CREOLE dishes use lard based roux, which is cooked (sometimes for almost an hour) until a beautiful mahogany brown. This dark base is indispensable for specialties like GUMBO.

Filé powder – Definition

Tagged: Creole Cooking | Related topics: , , , ,

[FEE-lay; fih-LAY] Choctaw Indians from the Louisiana bayou country are said to have been the first users of this seasoning made from the ground, dried leaves of the sassafras tree. It’s since become an integral part of CREOLE COOKING and is used the thicken and flavor GUMBO and other Creole dishes. Filé has a woodsy flavor reminiscent of root beer. It must be stirred into a dish after it’s removed from the heat because undue cooking make Filé tough and stringy. Filé powder is available in the spice or gourmet section of most large supermarkets. As with all spices, it should be stored in a cool, dark place for no more than 6 months.